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But Enough About You essay help service

In “Enough About You” (2006), Brian Williams argues that people today are very self-absorbed and that media and culture revolve around this way of thinking. He develops his idea by pointing out that America today is not the same as it used to be (“Diaries once sealed under lock and key are now called blogs.

Intimacies that were once whispered into the phone are now announced unabashedly into cell phones…”), especially because the “culture” nowadays surrounds the self-centered way of thinking through technology (“…television networks that already agree with your views, iPods that play only music you already know you like, Internet programs ready to filter out all but the news you want to hear”).

He exaggerates and mocks how self-oriented people are these days with ethos (“We’ve raised a generation of Americans on a mantra of love and the importance of self as taught by brightly colored authority figures with names like Barney and Elmo”) in order to amplify the consequence that comes from being egotistic: vital information will be ignored and every one will be ill-informed; cluelessness is not essential for a democracy.

Williams’ audience is both men and women in this modern era who are involved with technology, and his tone comes across as disappointed and earnest (“The danger just might be that we miss the next great book or the next great idea, or that we fail to meet the next great challenge…because we are too busy celebrating ourselves and listening to the same tune we already know by heart.

Willa Cather computer science essay help: computer science essay help

Willa Cather is well known author, mostly recognized for her novels based on the pioneer life of Great Plains. Cather’s first novel, Alexander’s Bridge, was published in 1912. Cather was awarded a Pulitzer Prize in 1922, for her novel, One of Ours. Willa Cather was born in Virginia in 1873, the oldest of seven children. Cather moved with her family to Red Cloud, Nebraska at age eight. This new home would provide the setting for most of Cather’s novels.

Cather later moved to Lincoln, Nebraska to attend the University of Nebraska, although at the time Cather was considering studying medicine. It was not until a paper from a writing class was published that Cather began to consider writing as a career. Cather had great success in her early years after college. For five years, from 1901 to 1906, Cather worked as an English teacher. Cather eventually moved to New York to work for McClure’s magazine. Cather rose throughout the magazine and eventually became the managing editor.

After five years Cather left McClure’s magazine to focus more on her own writing. After Cather’s departure from McClure’s Cather published several books, all focusing on the pioneer lifestyle. Cather even won a Pulitzer Prize. After Cather’s success, she had a period of mild depression. Although it has been mentioned that Cather’s depression may have produced some of her greatest works, which were written during this period. Willa Cather was greatly influenced in her writing by Flaubert, Tolstoy, Dickens, and Emerson. Cather looked to Tolstoy as an exceptional example of fictional writing.

While Cather greatly admired male authors, it is said that Cather regarded other female authors as overly emotional and sentimental. Willa Cather was a successful author, who wrote about the struggles of pioneer lifestyle throughout the mid to late 1800’s. Cather published many novels that are still well known today. Cather was awarded one of the most prestigious awards in writing, the Pulitzer Prize. Cather combated a period of depression and produced what some consider to be her best works. Cather was influenced by many great authors such as, Tolstoy Emerson, and Dickens. Many of Cather’s works are still popular today.

The Face of Battle devry tutorcom essay help: devry tutorcom essay help

The Face of Battle examines warfare from the viewpoint of the common soldier by analyzing and comparing three well-known battles. Starting with Agincourt, moving on to Waterloo, and finally the Somme, the author describes warfare as experienced by the warrior of the day. Characterizing the campaigns and planning which led up to each battle, Keegan provides background for each engagement he then seemingly details from the very midst of the carnage.

His expert knowledge and engaging style allow the book to make its point without losing the attention of the reader. The book’s fresh approach to battlefield history stems from Keegan’s overwhelming experience in the subject. Keegan taught at Britain’s Royal Military Academy Sandhurst as the Senior Lecturer in Military History for many years. In addition to writing numerous books on military history, Vassar College has named him a Delmas Distinguished Professor of History, he has been a Fellow of Princeton University (“Vintage,” Keegan), and is currently a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature.

Though he admits to never actually being in battle, Keegan’s extensive personal research, interviews, and scholarship on the subject of military history lend him plenty of credence to speak on the subject of battle. However, Keegan believes the men who fought in them should ideally relate their own histories. “…Where possible, an essential ingredient in battle narrative and battle analysis,” he says, “[is] allowing the combatants to speak for themselves. ” Keegan does, in fact, focus on a more immediate view of battle, as seen from the eyes of a common infantryman.

He uses both primary and secondary sources to reconstruct a certain picture of each battle in his book. However, both primary and secondary sources have pitfalls. As John Mundy, author of Europe in the High Middle Ages 1150-1300, in a review of The Face of Battle notes, “…soldiers present at an engagement usually exaggerate the numbers facing them… ” (679). One must also question his use of secondary historical sources. For instance, his rendition of Waterloo takes much of its information from the writing of Captain William Siborne, a British opographer who is credited with changing how the world perceived the Duke of Wellington after the Battle of Waterloo. After Siborne alleged that the Prussians had far more impact on Napoleon’s eventual defeat then previously believed, the Duke of Wellington lost much of his previous favor (Adamson). If Keegan had wanted to add more credibility to his work, he should have avoided controversial sources and dwelt more on the ideas his book attempts to convey, circumventing any possible impact to his own efforts.

However, his choice of historical material should not be used as a means to discredit his admirable conclusions. Keegan finds, through his study of the three chosen battles, that the central nature of warfare over the years remains unchanged. It is still today, despite advances in technology and tactics, an overwhelmingly man-to-man affair between individuals in a gruesome and horrific contest of violence.

Although mechanization and wireless communication have changed the character of battle, the principles of courage, fear, and leadership still dominate the battlefield. What battles have in common,” he states, “is human: the behavior of men struggling to reconcile their instinct for self-preservation, their sense of honor, and the achievement of some aim over which other men are ready to kill them,” (303). In his analysis of war through the ages, despite its many consistencies, Keegan notes several trends in the character of battle. For instance, in the uncertain examination of war he remarks that, “One statement can be safely made…battles have been getting longer,” (308).

At Agincourt, the English forces repelled a numerically superior French force in a matter of hours. The Battle of Waterloo found Napoleon defeated in a matter of days, while the battle of the Somme lasted months. Employing a creative analogy of the sport mountaineer, Keegan remarks on the exposure, technical difficulty, accident rate, and objectives dangers faced by modern soldiers as opposed to combatants of the past. Along with the increased duration of the average battle over the years, according to Keegan, the number and severity of “objective dangers” has gone up.

Waterloo and the Somme, with fatal casualty rates of 27 and 43 percent respectively, show on a small scale how technology and efficiency have increased the killing power of armies in the modern day and expanded the killing zone of the typical battle. The expansion of the killing zone, due in part to artillery, mines, and chemical agents, means that, today, troops cannot just “veer off into the neighboring wood,” or “take refuge in equally convenient woods,” (315). Partially out of duty, and partially out of necessity, they cannot just remove themselves from the killing zone.

Identifying trends like these, especially as they relate to the changing face of mountaineering, Keegan relates to his audience how battle changes while it simultaneously remains the same in many other respects. Keegan’s findings may conflict, though rightly so, with the common assumption that, as technology increases the firepower of common soldiers, battles are subsequently conducted through less and less close-range combat. Deeper examination of Waterloo, the Somme, and naturally Agincourt reveal, however, that infantry still do, even in modern warfare, engage in close-range combat.

Bayonets, in the Napoleonic era, caused a large portion of the casualties in each conflict. In WWII, even as tanks began to change the character of war, armies still fought and won battles with their infantry. Despite the mechanization of warfare, close combat still dominates the battlefield. Though he backs his claims and details his battles using many worthy and authoritative sources, Keegan’s writing falls short where he fails to cover a sufficient amount of each conflict.

According to John Beeler of the University of North Carolina – Greensboro, “The account of Agincourt (October 25, 1415) lacks the conviction of the later studies…” (1229). He explains further, regarding the chapter on the Somme, “Keegan has limited his coverage largely to the first day of the offensive,” (1229). The historical critic, therefore, finds fault not so much in what Keegan included in his text, but in what he left out. However, the author’s purpose was not to detail every part of each battle, but rather to expose battle as a whole for what it really was to the average soldier.

In choosing the three battles he did, battles with little in common, Keegan exposed how similar battles can be when seen through the eyes of a professional solder. The fight for life and victory, we find, is the same in the fifteenth as in the nineteenth century. The Face of Battle increased my knowledge of medieval, Napoleonic, and modern warfare. Additionally, the book offers an analysis of the trends of warfare over the past half millennium, a discerning investigation regarding current trends in warfare, and intelligent speculation on its future.

Keegan’s strongest writing comes from his analogy of mountaineering as it relates to combat and through his depiction of war as seen through eyes of the solder as opposed to the general. Through this relationship, he accurately translates the picture of battle to an arena where the common man can more easily grasp its significance and wrap his mind around its concepts. After all, the book aims to educate the student officer about the inevitable, timeless idea of conflict between men.

Social Hedonism instant essay help: instant essay help

In the world of ethics many people will argue that there is only one way to go. Reading for Monday 10/15/2012 Seaman Holmes, Ursula LeGuin Reading for Wednesday 10/17/2012 Nielson Williams What determines the value of a good? Our society tends to argue the two; quality vs. quantity. You cannot have both.

Try yourself to pick one theory and try to live your life by it.. Inconsistency can be a problem with values. Is it important to be consistent in determining ones values? In utilitarianism it is a very simple doctrine. The rightness or wrongness of actions is determined by the goodness or badness of the consequences of those actions. Referred to as the “greatest happiness theory. ” Egoistic vs. Non-egoistic Hedonism, a school of thought where a person is pursuing pleasure, or pleasantness.

It could be nothing extreme, because extreme pain would lead to extreme pain. The ideal view is intellectual and not just physical. The pursuit of pleasure in moderation, and comes to one intellectually. (as seen by the greeks) philosophical pleasure. Ideal Utilitarianism, goodness or badness depends on other things then pleasantness. Experiencing beauty and knowledge come into play when trying to determine the right or wrong thing to do.

Its not just looking at it for the pleasure sake Social Hedonism, tend to be Utilitarians. They are motivated to create the greatest pleasure for the greatest number. Quality of pleasure or quantity of pleasure? Some would argue that producing pleasure for 1/3 and not 2/3 that the greatest pleasure would go in favor of the 1/3 and not the majority. Again either quantity or quality. Bentham is quantity (Benton has t’s in his name) Mill is quality.

Quick Thinking Saves the Day my essay help uk: my essay help uk

A woman came running out of a nearby shop, screaming that her child was in the burning apartment building. Before anyone had the opportunity to do anything or to call the Fire Appliance, Mackey was there to the rescue! Out of nowhere, he scaled up a coconut tree, jumped through the flaming window and rescued the child from the burning building! He became an instant hero on that day. It was a clear bright and hot sunny midday, not a cloud in sight.

In the twinkling of an eye smoke was seen emanating from the window and then the bursting flames. The wind was strong and as Mackey ascended the tree, the top began to sway dangerously to the burning building. There were “ooohs” and “aaaahs” from the crowd below that were growing in numbers. Mackey was cool as a cucumber; he continued his climb until he was within reaching distance with the window. The heat was blistering hot! Mackey began reaching for his back pocket for a bottle of water.

Taking a few gulps of water to quenched his thirst, he poured the remaining water over his head and face. This was to protect him from the heat and possible burns he may suffer once inside the building. With great dexterity and skill, Mackey leapt through the burning inferno coming from the window in search of the child. The heat was unbearable! By this time the crowd had grown to twice as much, anxious to see the outcome. The few minutes passed that seemed like hours and no signs of Mackey or the child yet, not even a cry or voices heard.

Some people began murmuring that it was a brave way to die; others said he would be remembered for his unselfish act of bravery. Others still hoping he would appear at the window soon, while some began praying and asking God to help keep them alive. It was solemn sight to see. Then, all of a sudden Mackey appeared with the crying child in his arms to the applause of an appreciative crowd. Her mother clasped her hands thanking The Almighty for sparing her child and keeping her alive and safe through this horrible ordeal. By this time the fire appliance arrived with its blazing sirens.

The automatic ladder was hoisted up with the cabin at its end. Mackey placed the frightened child into it first and fastened the seat belt around her. He then entered into it with his nimble frame and the firemen soon had them brought down safely with a thunderous applause from the overwhelming crowd. Everyone began thanking God for His great mercies, that there was no loss of life. The fire was soon brought under control by the quick response of the firemen. There was excessive damage to the apartment but the building itself was saved.

The child and Mackey were attended to by the paramedics and just suffered from minor burns. They were both all right. Thus, it was a fitting end to such an unfortunate scenario. Though the mother may have lost her belongings in that fire, her daughter was saved. Mackey’s quick thinking and actions led him to climb that tree, jumped through the fiery window and saved a child’s life. He risked his own life to save someone in need and that was very admirable from him. From that day, the community held Mackey in high esteem and admiration!

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