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Human Rights and Children aqa unit 5 biology synoptic essay help

The UN Convention on the Rights of a Child 1989 – in 1989 the world leaders decided children needed a special convention just for them to give them special care and protection that adults do not need. All children up to the age of 18 have the rights in the convention. Some groups of children eg those living away from home or disabled children have additional rights to make sure they are treated fairly and their needs are met.

Every child in the UK is entitled to 40 specific rights, included in these are: the right to life, survival and development; to have their views respected; to have a name and nationality; freedom of expression, to live in a family environment or alternative care and have contact with parents wherever possible; to have health care and social security; to have an education, be able to take part in leisure, culture and arts; Special protection for refugee children, children in the juvenile justice system, deprived children and children suffering sexual, economic or other forms of exploitation.

These rights apply to all children with no exceptions. The Education Act 2002 – is an act to make provision about education, training and childcare. The act implements the legal requirements and commitments set out in the white paper Schools: Achieving success. It is intended to raise standards, promote innovation in schools and reform education law.

It covers everything from schools being able to innovate and raise standards, schools joining together and forming companies, setting a flexible governance framework that allows greater discretion at local levels, allowing schools to be used as a resource within the community, separating out the budget making it clearer how funding is divided up and setting a minimum schools budget and also additional methods of funding available, providing frameworks for admission, exclusion and attendance, sets the school curriculum distinguishing between the key stages, enables schools to be more flexible with their staffing, develop partnerships with other agencies and give effective support within the classroom and it also sets out the statutory duty schools have with regards to the protection and involvement of children. Further measures are introduced to ensure weak and failing schools are turned around as quickly as possible. Children Act 2004 and 2006 – reforms the law relating to children making provisions about the services provided to and for children in need by local authorities and other persons providing a wider strategy for improving children’s lives, targeting those with additional needs.

It makes provision about advisory and support services relating to family proceedings, to make provision about fostering, child minding and day care, adoption review panels, the defence of reasonable punishment, the making of grants as respects children and families, child safety orders, the publication of material relating to children involved in certain legal proceedings and disclosure of information relating to children. The Freedom of Information Act 2000 – if the establishment you work in is part of the public sector, the Freedom of Information Act means you must produce a publication scheme outlining the information that is routinely made available to the public eg minutes of meetings, annual reports or financial information. It also means official information must be disclosed when people ask for it (unless there is a good legal reason not to).

Schools must produce a school profile and school prospectus containing the latest Ofsted report and current performance levels. The Human Rights Act 1998 – its aim is to give further effect in the UK to the rights contained in the European Convention of Human Rights. The act applies to all public bodies within the UK, including the central government, local authorities and bodies exercising public functions. The act provides that it is unlawful for a public authority to act in a way that contravenes the Convention Rights. The Human Rights Act affects all other laws – it says that every UK law must respect your convention Rights, public authorities cannot ignore your rights and that they can be taken to a UK court or tribunal if they do.

All UK courts and tribunals must take convention rights into account in all their rulings and not just in cases brought under the Human Rights Act. Special Educational Needs, codes of practise (SEN) 2001- it includes the rights and duties introduced by the SEN and Disability Act 2001. Local Education Authorities, schools, early education settings, health and social services must all have regard to the Code of Practice. It sets out a model of intervention, early education settings action and early years action plus and in school settings a school action and school action plus. The code puts emphasis on working with parents, pupil participation and working in partnerships with other agencies.

It includes a stronger right for children with Special Education Needs to be educated in a mainstream school, a requirement that Local Educational Authorities provide services offering advice and information and means of resolving disputes, a new duty on schools and relevant Early Years providers to keep parents informed when they are making special educational provisions for their child, and the right for schools and relevant educational providers to request a statutory assessment of a child. The Disability Discrimination Act 1995/2005 – under the act it is unlawful for a school or other education provider to treat a disabled pupil unfavourably. They should not either directly or indirectly discriminate against the child arising from a disability.

For example a pupil cannot be refused admission simply because they are disabled, a pupil can’t not be stopped from doing something because it takes them to long to do it. Pupils should not be harassed because of their disability, a teacher cannot shout a disabled pupil if the disability means they are unable to concentrate. The school must provide reasonable adjustments to ensure the pupil is not discriminated against. Data Protection Act 1998 – protects personal data in the UK. It gives people the fundamental rights and freedoms to their right to privacy with respect to the processing of personal data. Personal data must be obtained fairly and lawfully, data should only be used for the specific purpose it was collected.

The data subject should be informed of the who the data controller (institution), the purpose for which the data is intended. The data must be kept accurate and up to date and shall not be kept for longer then necessary. Schools must keep formal pupil records that are updated once a year, under the data protection act all pupils are entitled to have their educational records disclosed to them. There is certain information that is exempt from disclosure, information that could cause serious harm to the pupil or someone else or that would put them at risk, but this information may be passed to another educational establishment. Disclosure is permissible if the record does not allow identification of the third party.

Every Child Matters Agenda 2004 – its main aims are for every child, whatever their background or circumstances, to have the support they need to be healthy, stay safe, enjoy and achieve, make a positive contribution and achieve an economic well-being. It requires multi-agency partnerships working together to achieve to be aware of the contribution by each others’ service and to deliver their work with children accordingly. In my role I support the child to help them achieve to the best of their ability. I have to respect the rights of every child with whom I work and not discriminate against any child because of their nationality, disability etc.

I must ensure they are as inclusive as possible and respect their privacy, but also work closely with teachers, support staff within the school and sometimes if required any outside agencies involved to ensure the child has as much support as possible where needed. 4. 3 (a) (b) Explain the roles of regulatory bodies relevant to the education sector including general bodies and school specific regulatory bodies. The regulatory bodies relevant to the education sector are there to monitor and enforce legislative framework, they include: Criminal Records Bureau – provides access to check the criminal records of all staff and volunteers working within organisations in the public, private and voluntary sectors, making it easier to identify people who may be unsuitable for work involving children or vulnerable adults.

Health and Safety Executive (HSE) – continually work with other government departments and agencies to ensure that pupil safety and employee safety are properly considered and duly protected. They ensure that education duty holders manage any significant risks within school premises eg requirements are met for managing asbestos; slips and trips. It also encourages a common sense approach to risk management; all risks should be managed responsibly and sensibly whilst still providing children with a range of valuable learning experiences. Any major accidents or injuries must be notified to the HSE. Ofsted is the Office for Standards in Education, Children’s Services and Skills.

They regulate and inspect to ensure children’s services in local areas are achieving excellence in the care of children and young people including services for looked after children, safeguarding and child protection. They are independent from the government ministers and report directly to Parliament so they can give impartial information. They carry out large numbers of inspections and regulatory visits in England seeking to promote areas of improvement and encourage services to provide value for money. All their findings are published on their website. Local Education Authority (LEA) – have the responsibility for education and children’s services. For state schools in their area they organise funding, allocate the number of places available at each school and employ all teachers (except voluntary aided and foundation schools).

Kingfisher Beer Company Case Analysis essay help online free: essay help online free

Kingfisher Beer Company (KBC) has enjoyed being in top position in premium beer segment for the past fifty years and is now facing a potentially identity–changing challenge: the traditional premium beer market has been declining due to changes in consumer preferences at a compound annual rate of 4% and KBC for the first time is experiencing a decline in revenue, whilst a change in leadership infuses new energy to bring a change in their product line.

Jake Hope, son of the retired president and owner of KBC faces the challenge of whether to introduce a ‘light’ beer in a growing beer segment, as maintaining status-quo would no more be an option to sustain their existing position in marketplace in the next few years (see Exhibit 2). I recommend that Jake would go for the light beer product venture. The recommendation is based on a complex assessment of the company’s financial viability and of more qualitative reflections.

Even if for the year 2007 (the case is restrictive for only a 2-year horizon quantitative analysis) projected Operating Margin does not reach levels KBC had enjoyed in prior years, it is positive and growing substantially. Growth from $599,734 to $2,205,235 ($1,605,601 in absolute growth) from 2006 to 2007 with introduction of Light Beer versus of decline from $4,015,024 to $3,414,586 ($600,438 in absolute decline).

If KBC will manage to reduce its lost sales of famous Lager (due to market conditions in the premium beer market) from 20% to slightly lower levels then the company could break-even in 2 years (Exhibit 1). From the case’s limited data it is still certain that introducing Light Beer and managing relatively moderate levels of cannibalization (20% or below – Exhibit 3) of the Lager sales opens opportunities to increase the firm’s financials. Moreover, it is essential to capitalize on growing light beer market (4% annually) which also will help fuel possible future expansion or to retain sustainability.

According to market research, targeted segment where light beer drinking segment holds “anti-big-business” values, is already aware of the KBC brand so the firm can leverage on being independent family owned small regional company. In addition, the introduction of a new product will eliminate the risk of being on a single product brand and reduce risk of being in an unfavorable position with regards to distributors who favor more product offerings. On the other hand the introduction of the light beer will affect the brand image, alienate core customers, and squeeze margins.

In addition, it is most likely the Company will not be able to sustain advertising and distribution cost against bigger competitors (high entry barrier, competitors strong presence in light beer market). This will lead also to additional unwanted cannibalization of Lager sales and more uneven relationships with distributors and retailers. My recommendation rests on several assumptions (exhibit). The key assumption is that the KBC will attain the 0. 25 market share to break even in 2007. Another assumption is that the light beer market will sustain its growth and consumer preferences will hold in the nearest future.

Hotel and Hospitality Industry college essay help free: college essay help free

Hospitality management, in hotel and restaurant management, is a very interesting and challenging program, which has become a popular career choice for most of the young generation in this century. This is a diploma program, which provides students the opportunity to become an excellent manager in the hospitality industry. The program is divided into four semesters. The first two semesters focus on basic managerial skills and the hospitality industry. In these semesters, students will learn about mixology – the art or skill of preparing mixed drinks (Graham).

They will also learn food and beverage service theory which is about theoretical components that relate to food and beverage department of hospitality business (“Fanshane college,”). Effective leadership and management courses will train students how to behave and act as a leader in the hospitality environment. Hospitality and tourism careers will introduce students to their careers, show them how hospitality and tourism affects us, and students will also recognize numerous career opportunities available to them.

In the third semester, students will select two of five electives to focus on specific area of their careers: Entrepreneurship, wine appreciation and food pairing, risk management and hospitality law, fundamentals of beer. For the last semester, students will have a chance to practice what they learned in a 14 weeks internship in a real hospitality environment. Hospitality industry is believed to have a bright future. Graduated students will have all the qualifications to seek a job in different areas, such as front office, housekeeping, food and beverage operation, human resources, marketing and sales, hotel and restaurant management.

As the hospitality business environment becomes more and more complex (J. West and Tonarelli-Frey,2008), it will provide many opportunities for students. Due to traveling demand, the number of hotels and resorts has increased in the last few years, which make the hospitality industry full of opportunities (Prasain). The average monthly income for a hotel and restaurant manager in Canada is about 5500 CAD, and for other jobs in hospitality industry like bartender, cook, receptionist, chef, and supervisor of food service is around 1000 CAD to 4000CAD ( “salary explorer”,2012).

Although the hospitality industry has many opportunities, graduated students from the program still need other skills, such as communication, foreign language ability, leadership, strong analytical ability, creativity and a strong work ethic. As foreign language ability is the key element in the hospitality industry, the more languages students can speak, the more advantages they have. For hotel and restaurant manager, students are required to know at least three languages.

Hospitality environment is also one of the most complicated work’s environments as it involves many cultures, many ethnic groups from many countries. Furthermore, it needs very high security control. Hotel managers/staffs need to be extremely careful not only in communication with their guests, but also in making any type of decision, because their hotels may end up as breeding grounds for illegal activities such as narcotics or prostitution. To sum up, the hospitality industry is a developing industry, which offers many opportunities for students. It is also a well-paid job.

In order to be successful in this complex environment, students are required to be determined, independent, self-monitoring and most important of all, have passion for their job. The reason I choose to study and work in this environment is because I’m a hard worker, I always want to keep myself busy, and I love to communicate and meet new people. I know that the hospitality environment is very complex, and the risk that employees may have to face, but I believe in my ability to resolve any problem. Every industry has its own good side and bad side, the most important reason that keeps us not to give up is the passion for our career.

Bureaucratic Control System english essay help online: english essay help online

In this assignment I will be discussing the discrepancy from the Sandwich Blitz scenario that I watched. I will also be discussing how the issue could have been avoided, how the Bureaucratic Control System could be applied, and the steps with the system. There was an issue with the supervisor allowing an employee to report time that wasn’t worked in that specific pay period. By having a control system in place will mitigate many discrepancies that could possibly occur because there would be protocol and disciplinary actions.

The bureaucratic Control system is designed to measure progress toward set performance goals and to apply corrective measures. This is essential in running any business. How can you run a business without structure? With this system there are rules and standards that needs to be followed. This is where the four steps of the control system come into play. Setting performance standards is the first step in the control system. These standards clarify what is to be expected from staff.

In the case of Sandwich Blitz, Dalman and Lei had no standards put in place so the employees didn’t know what was expected of them. This enabled the supervisor to allow a staff member to report hours that were not yet earned. Measuring performance is the second step in the control process. It’s basically developing methods to collect and organize what is going on within the company. This is definitely a step that needs to be taken with Dalman and Lei.

They need to have a sit down and see what is going on with their payroll. See how much damage that had been done thus far. I would suggest that their middle management report submit lower level staff time on a weekly basis so it can be accounted for accordingly. Comparing performance with the standard, in my words is evaluating the standards that were put in place. This step was actually taken in Sandwich Blitz because this is how Lei identified the discrepancy with the unpaid time.

By evaluating employees performance there could be an evaluation for preset standards. Applying this process, Dalman and Lei can see what works for their business and what don’t work for them. The last and fourth step is talking action to correct problems and reinforce successes. The in-text meaning of this is to ensure that operations are adjusted to achieve the planned results or to continue exceeding the plain if the manager determines that is possible.

(Batman&Snell, 2009 P297) In other words it’s stating that once the standards are set and we take corrective action to ensure that the methods and standards are corresponding. In summary, following the bureaucratic control system is needed to regulate. Rules and regulations must be put in place to evade unnecessary issues A business needs a formalized structure such as bureaucracy. Standards are the top of the list for me because once that is in place the blue print of operation is in order. Along with follow up and righting wrong, everything else is smooth sailing.

Amistad Reflection Paper buy essay help: buy essay help

“ Amistad “ Reaction The movie ” Amistad ” was a great movie. while watching this movie in class, the begining of the movie was kind of intense , but then throughtout the next scenes it was kind of boring. The movie made it seem like it was a few white people and blacks against everyone else when that actually was not the case. One thing that should have been included in this three hour movie is the favor that the public of the north had for the Africans. Also, there definitely should’ve been a lot more racism included to show you how black people were viewed and treated as back in those times.

It wasn’t just the triumph of the defense, but more of a monumental win for slaves everywhere in a way that would have you skeptical for more. In this movie we hear many different stories as each character tries to explain why his view is the right one. In the first courtroom scene we hear several different “stories” about what should happen to the Africans. All of those stories assume that the Africans are property; the only question is whose property they are. Interestingly, as “property,” they can not be charged with murder or theft.

One cannot be both property and capable of forming criminal intent. The only issue before the court is where the Africans will go. This movie takes on the basis of two core themes, suffering and survival. The way in which these two are represented can label the film as unique. The opening scenes of the enslaved Africans overrunning the Amistad, killing its crew and taking over sets the tone of the movie , and the people watching it is never allowed to forget the image of the African screaming as he thrusts his sword into one of his former captors.

The enslaved Africans are not represented as supplicants: they have fought for their freedom. These scenes are coupled with representations of the Middle Passage which are often considered to be the most powerful aspect of the film. This distinctive approach to the movie that represents the Atlantic slave trade is also evident in the portrayal of African culture and identity. Sengbe, the lead member of the enslaved Africans, is shown as strong, knowledgeable and surprisingly intelligent.

Rather than turn the story of the Amistad into a celebration of the kindness and generosity of white abolitionists, Sengbe is shown to be the instigator and cause of the freedom which is eventually granted to the enslaved Africans. This was my very first time watching a movie with the storyline like this and after watching and understanding the key points of this movie , i would highly recommend others to watch it.

Ghana, the mixed capitalist college application essay help online: college application essay help online

Gold Coast, now Ghana had his independence in 1957 after a long struggle with our colonial masters, the British by Kwame Nkrumah and others who helped in diverse ways such as “the Big Six” and others. Colonized by the British, Ghana has gone through a lot of systems of governance; Monarchical, autocracy and now democracy. So is with economic systems which go with any form of governance system. Currently there are about four (4) economic systems in the world which are; socialist, capitalist, mixed economy (Socialist and Capitalist) and Islamic economic jurisprudence. The Economic Systems

All these are economic systems and it is defines those who controls and owns the economic resources which forms the “means” in economics. Every economy is measured by the usage of its means and the nature of the “means” owners determines the kind of economic system the country runs. Socialist system of economy is a one that has its resources highly controlled by the central government. E. g. USSR (Russia, Ukraine, Yugoslavia etc), the Capitalist economy is that whose resources is highly owned and controlled by private individuals or a body other than the government. E. g. USA, UK, part of Europe etc.

The Mixed economy is that which combines both the socialist and the capitalist economic systems to run the country’s economy. In that, the central government controls part of the economy whiles the other part is controlled by private participation. Functions of the Economic Systems There are multiple components to economic systems. Their interaction may be coherent or result in instability. Decision-making structures of an economy determine the use of economic inputs (the factors of production), distribution of output, the level of centralization in decision-making, and who makes these decisions.

Decisions might be carried out by industrial councils, by a government agency, or by private owners. Every economic system represents an attempt to solve three fundamental and interdependent problems: What goods and services shall be produced and in what quantities? How shall goods and services be produced? That is, by whom and with what resources and technologies? For whom shall goods and services be produced? That is, who is to enjoy the benefits of the goods and services and how is the total product to be distributed among individuals and groups in the society.

E. g. the current load management by the VRA and the ECG. Thus every economy is a system that allocates resources for exchange, production, distribution and consumption. The system is stabilized through a combination of threat and trust, which are the outcome of institutional arrangements. An economic system possesses the following institutions: Methods of control over the factors or means of production: this may include ownership of, or property rights to, the means of production and therefore may give rise to claims to the proceeds from production.

The means of production may be owned privately, by the state, by those who use them or be held in common. A decision-making system: this determines who is eligible to make decisions over economic activities. Economic agents with decision-making powers can enter into binding contracts with one another. A coordination mechanism: this determines how information is obtained and used in decision-making. The two dominant forms of coordination are planning and markets; planning can be either de-centralized or centralized, and the two coordination mechanisms are not mutually exclusive and often co-exist.

An incentive system: this induces and motivates economic agents to engage in productive activities. It can be based on either material reward (compensation or self-interest) or moral suasion (for instance, social prestige or through a democratic decision-making process that binds those involved). The incentive system may encourage specialization and the division of labour. Organizational form: there are two basic forms of organization: actors and regulators. Economic actors include households, work gangs and production teams, firms, joint-ventures and cartels.

Economically regulative organizations are represented by the state and market authorities; the latter may private or public entities. A distribution system: this allocates the proceeds from productive activity, which is distributed as income among the economic organizations, individuals and groups within society, such as property owners, workers and non-workers, or the state (from taxes). A public choice mechanism for law-making, establishing rules, norms and standards and levying taxes. Usually this is the responsibility of the state but other means of collective decision-making are possible, such as workers’ councils.

The Ghana’s Economy Ghana’s economy is purely a mixed type with the resources sharply divided between the public and private participation. The service sector is highly controlled by the government while the production sector is dominated by private and group participation. Decision making, which determines the direction of the economy and the type system, is done a lot of the times, through consultations with stakeholders of the economy. Example; when the power and water companies wanted to review utility tariffs to a certain percentage, there was a lot of consultations thereby; getting the rate we have now.

Ghana, before the independence was purely capitalist. After independence, the then government focused on turning the economy into a communist/socialist system. They invested so much in agriculture which was the only sector controlled by the government and also reached out to industrialize the economy. Currently, Ghana is well-endowed with natural resources and agriculture accounts for roughly one-quarter of GDP and employs more than half of the workforce, mainly small landholders. The services sector accounts for 50% of GDP. Gold and cocoa production and individual remittances are major sources of foreign exchange.

Oil production at Ghana’s offshore Jubilee field began in mid-December, 2010, and is expected to boost economic growth. Finally, I may agree with the statement but require more facts to completely justify its truth. Ghana is a mixed economy but capitalist oriented on the face assessment value of the various sectors. But can justify, if all percentages of public/private participation of the economic sectors are well defined. This will couple with the clear policy direction of the present governments which has state on record as being social democrats and has manifestoes seeking to provide a lot for the people.

Database and Nouns Major Topics essay help site:edu: essay help site:edu

In Grandfield College, the Software-Tracking database will be used to help in managing the school’s software licensing. The software will be watched for lifecycle and version corrections as well as keeping track of the number of users accessing the software under the constraints of the license agreement. The faculty and staff computers will be followed for which version and licensed copy of software is presently running on each system. Objectives: 1. Have a better system by allowing employees to see the shared calendars and student’s grades.

Advance the tracking of Software Licensing and the Lifecycle of programs. Preliminary timeline: 1. Gathering Data: Meet with School Board and those involved to discuss the needs and wants for a database. 2. Analyzing Data: The information gathered from the meeting will be analyzed and form a rough draft of the database model. 3. Normalization: The database model will be completed and all last minute changes adjusted and any lasting questions answered. 4. Building the physical database: The database model will be constructed into the actual database program. Lab 1. 4 – Challenge Activity 1. There could be more than one Joe Smith entered into the database and info between the two could be confused. Misspelling could occur. 2. The relational database could assign a unique identifier to an entry and any changes to customer info could be managed in one area. 3. The biggest drawback is the chance of a misspelling after the fifth entry (for example) creating a whole new customer data file for an existing entity. 4. I would create at least three tables one for customer info, one for customer payments, and one that shows all payment info.

Invention Essay law essay help: law essay help

During the Industrial Revolution numerous inventions were created in order to solve problems that arose at that time. Also, in this time period one invention created a “ripple-effect” that soon led to the development of another invention. Over time as more and more innovations came about the simpler life became. In our current time period there are a variety of inventions that people use to simplify their lives on a daily basis. Nowadays many of these utilities are taken advantage of. People do not comprehend that without these inventions they would not be able to carry out certain tasks as efficiently as they do now.

Inventions that I believe are the most important in my life are the automobile, eye glasses, and electricity. Without any single one of these inventions my life would be drastically different and exceptionally more difficult. Without an automobile I would not be able to travel from one place to another in a lesser amount of time. Also, if a required something immediately I would not be able to go get it. Moreover, if I were in need of medical services I wouldn’t be able to drive to a hospital in proximity. Eye glasses are essential tool in my life since I have myopia.

I have been wearing eye glasses since I was five years old. Without eye glasses I wouldn’t be able to see anything which in turn would slow down my reflexive abilities as well as lengthen the time I need in order to respond to stimuli. Electricity is the energy supplied in the form of currents to houses or other buildings for heating, lighting, or powering appliances. If electricity was no longer available to me other aspects of my life would also be affected. Losing all or any of these inventions would affect my life and most likely change the way how I function.

Customer profitability narrative essay help: narrative essay help

Pilgrim Bank (A) is a case that analyzes customer profitability in a retail banking setting. It explores a business phenomenon common to the retail banking industry and, within this context, acquaints you with the types of managerial questions that can be made by data analysis. As a recently hired analyst, Alan Green (your group’s role) has data on a sample of customers and must make recommendations about whether the bank should charge fees or offer rebates for use of the online channel. The data consist of customer-level information on demographics, online channel use, and profitability.

The dataset is now available for downloading on our course blackboard website. The first worksheet is “Definition of Variables” and the second worksheet is the dataset. Link to purchase Pilgrim Bank Case: https://cb. hbsp. harvard. edu:443/cbmp/access/25928453 Requirements: Write a business report summarizing your analysis and findings. The report should include the answers to the following assigned questions, which are useful when Alan Green (or your group) meets with Ravi Raman next Monday morning. Remember to support/justify your answers.

How do retail banks make money from their customers? How much variation is there in profit across customers? Based on this, what do you recommend the bank do in terms of matching service levels to customer profit levels? 2. Based on the sample of customer data for 1999, what can you conclude about average customer profitability for pilgrim Bank’s entire customer population? 3. Is the difference in average profitability between online and offline customers in the sample indicative of a meaningful difference in probability across these groups for Pilgrim Bank’s entire customer population?

What role does customer demographics play in analyzing customer profitability for online and offline customers? 1 5. What is your recommendation to the senior management team in terms of Pilgrim Bank’s online channel pricing strategy? Should the bank charge fees, offer rebates, or do nothing in regards to pricing for online channel use? As always, be careful when making recommendations to the senior management team. You should provide enough explanations/justifications with data analysis (statistic tests).

The main text of your report should NOT be longer than SIX pages (double-spaced, 1-1. 5 inch margins, Times New Roman 12 pt font). You can provide some results of your data analysis in appendix which will not count toward the maximum page length. Please have ONE member of your group submit the assignment to both Blackboard and to turnitin. com (course ID: 7434367; enrollment password: winter2014) by Friday April 4 at 11:00pm. Remember to include the group cover page with your submission. Please see information posted on Blackboard for detailed submission instructions.

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